Good intentions

I have had a blog running for some time now, but, as far as I am aware, a cousin in Los Angeles is the only person who has every visited it. This is just as well because it is very boring and full of worthy stuff. So re-inspired by Bill Thompson’s address to the diocesan clergy conference about the value and fun of blogging and encouraged by my good friend Alan Wilson, Bishop of Buckingham, who has a really good and interesting site, I am back and full of good intentions to keep this blog a) running and b) interesting (I hope).

So I am sat here on holiday in France, very early in the morning, unable to sleep and making a start. My main concern at the moment is that France is in turmoil. The fishermen have blockaded the oil refineries and the ports – I have enough fuel to get me about halfway up the country and a time window of 48 hrs to get back to the UK from when the dog has been treated for ticks, fleas etc. – so sitting around in Calais waiting for the port to open or (worse) sitting in a motorway service station waiting for a delivery – are complicated options. This short break may be longer than I had anticipated!

Anyway, I am reading the novel ‘Deaf Sentence’ by David Lodge. Much to be recommended – it is funny and a good read, but also a moving insight into the world of deafness, ageing and mortality. Having just marked the passing of another year in my own life – it feels apt!

I am also using my time away to get back to my research into the changing nature of incumbency. Last September I decided to take a year off from the formal academic mountain of looking into how the job of a Vicar is changing, but the work still goes on. This week I am trying to get the research back into order so that I can start the next academic year with a sense of focus. The i-vicar project is still in the air, but needs more work and ideas. Any thoughts suggestions etc. would be most welcome.

Bill Thompson commended blogging not only as a good way of sharing ideas and thoughts but also a way of circumventing the press. These days you have to controversial to get any sort of space in the media. As I firmly believe in a reasonable God, I find it difficult to be heard amidst the voices of the extreme. You can sense journalists losing interest as you try to give a balanced and reasonable response to the story they are driving. Reasonableness, balance and compassion are in short supply in our world – so I hope that this blog will be a forum for Godly reasonableness in making a faithful response to the challenges which face us. Please do join in.

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2 Responses to Good intentions

  1. Go for it. It does surprise me how much information is floating around on the web and how powerful the search engines are, provided you have the patience for unending scrolling. I’m in the position of having volunteered to “support” efforts in creating our own benefice website and finding that I am, so far, the only volunteer. Adds a new dimension to the phrase “blind leading the blind”. Stems from the clergy Swanwick conference apparently and exhortations to grasp new media- Thanks Bishops!!

  2. Michael Stamford says:

    Good evening, Bishop David,
    Having just found your Blog, and hoping that more souls than your cousin in LA have visited it, I felt I must add my name to the list.
    Otherwise you might decide it wasn’t worth the candle!
    Of course, some of what you write needs a bit of study and meditation to reach a position where one can make a meaningful comment; so I have started with this light-hearted blog of yours.
    Please keep up the good work,
    ~ Mike ~

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